agelfeygelach:

tyrelonmelon:

I’m this bunnies momma

congratulations on your fluffy baby

madeleineishere:

quick lil comic
madeleineishere:

quick lil comic

madeleineishere:

quick lil comic

cburgoin:

Houston Texas from sunrise to night life.
cburgoin:

Houston Texas from sunrise to night life.
cburgoin:

Houston Texas from sunrise to night life.
cburgoin:

Houston Texas from sunrise to night life.

cburgoin:

Houston Texas from sunrise to night life.

guysanddogs:

"This was the prize inside of my Cracker Jack box." - Ben Schwartz, @rejectedjokes​

(Source: oh-fabianski)

Fucking fabulous. Damn.

(Source: Spotify)

ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.
ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacationAround 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation. The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days. About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks. The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences. 

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.

ctrlaltcheyenne:

utaustin:

UT’s turtles take a summer vacation

Around 140 turtles were captured from the Turtle Pond north of The University of Texas at Austin Tower Monday morning for a quick summer vacation.

The turtles, ranging in size from about a foot in length to about the size of a half-dollar, were transported to a secure pond at the university’s Brackenridge Field Lab on Lake Austin Boulevard while the largest pool is drained and cleaned over the next few days.

About 15 student volunteers from the Texas History Natural Collection, the College of Natural Sciences, Professors David Hillis and Travis J. LaDuc, worked together to capture turtles in the lower pond, load them into tubs or wading pools and transport them into two trucks.

The turtles and their vegetation will return from their summer vacation in about two weeks after
University work crews drain the lower pond and remove sediment from the bottom of the pond. Crews will also provide maintenance to the pumps and remove algae and mud from the pump manifold. They also will position rocks and logs within the lower pond to provide more basking sites for the turtles.

The Turtle Ponds, which were built over the period 1934 – 1939, provide an aesthetic value to the campus, but they also are an observational research site for students of the biological sciences.

As someone who personally attended UT, I cannot BELIEVE they are in that water. Look at the turtles - LOOK AT THEM - they are covered in algae sludge. blegh.

turningpoint2:

Michele Hart Photography

(Source: simply-divine-creation)

annamielech:

Iran, November 2011
annamielech:

Iran, November 2011
annamielech:

Iran, November 2011
annamielech:

Iran, November 2011
annamielech:

Iran, November 2011

annamielech:

Iran, November 2011

(Source: miinddy)